Raw duck heads for dogs

Raw Duck Heads for Dogs: How to Feed & Where to Buy

Raw duck heads for dogs have been a favorite in my pack since 2015.

They’re a great source of calcium, phosphorus, iron, and amino acids, all of which are important for bone and muscle growth/regeneration.

Raw duck heads weigh around 4 oz and are great for medium to large dogs. 

K9sOverCoffee.com | Raw duck heads for dogs: How to feed & where to buy

Raw Duck Heads Are Raw Meaty Bones (= RMBs)

Duck heads are known as raw meaty bones in raw feeding. As such, they’re soft and crunchy, and great at cleaning dog teeth and exercising their jaws.

I haven’t touched a doggie toothbrush ONCE since I began feeding raw in 2015! Raw meaty bones are all you need to keep your pup’s teeth clean.

Check out my pup Wally’s clean pearlies in the picture below:

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Duck Heads Are 75% Bone

Raw duck heads consist of about 75% bone and 25% muscle meat. That means that a 4 oz duck head has a bone content of 3 oz bone and 1 oz of meat.

What’s great about them is that they also come with brains and eyes, albeit very little. Those are secreting organs and important to feed for variety!

Raw duck head on a food scale
Weighing a raw duck head

Good to know: Raw dog food consists of 70-80% muscle meat (including fish), 10% raw meaty bones, and 10% secreting organs.

If you choose to add plant matter like fruit, veggies, seeds and nuts, feed 70% muscle meat and 10% plant matter. Otherwise, feed 80% muscle meat.

Duck Is A Cooling Protein

Duck falls into the category of cooling proteins. Chinese food energetics differentiate between cooling, warming, hot, and neutral foods.

Dogs can show signs of food allergies when they’re fed a predominantly cool or warm diet. What happens is that their body is out of harmony from a food source perspective.

One approach to figure out what food category your dog doesn’t do well is the so-called elimination diet.

With this approach, you feed one protein source for several weeks and observe your dog’s reaction to it.

If his body doesn’t react to it (think itching, scratching, and/or yeasty ears), he can eat it.

My pup Wally eats a mix of neutral, cooling, and warm protein sources.

Other cooling proteins are rabbit, pork and certain fish (e.g. whitefish, crab).

Just FYI: Neutral, Warming, and Heating Proteins

Neutral protein sources are:

  • Beef
  • Bison
  • Goose
  • Quail
  • Certain fish like mackerel, herring, salmon, and sardines

Warming protein sources are:

  • Chicken
  • Turkey
  • Pheasant
  • Certain fish like mussels, anchovies, lobster, and shrimp

Heating protein sources are:

  • Lamb
  • Venison
  • Certain fish like trout

How to Feed Raw Duck Heads For Dogs

Raw duck heads can be fed as part of a raw meal or in between meals as a snack. My current dog Wally is a 38 lb Feist mix and enjoys both options.

Sometimes, I include his duck head in his bowl along with muscle meat and secreting organs.

Raw Feeding Miami Review - My dog Wally's raw dog food features a raw duck head and other cuts of meat from Raw Feeding Miami
Wally’s raw meal features a duck head, beef green tripe, beef tongue, chicken breast, green lipped mussel, and organ mix Monstermash

Other times, I’ll give him the head separately, usually outside on the patio or in the backyard. 

Tip: If your dog tends to try and gulp bones whole, hold one end of the duck head while you let your dog chew on the other end.

That way, your dog is forced to chew on it and won’t be able to swallow the head whole.

When I give Wally the head separately, I’ll feed him muscle meat and secreting organs for breakfast and the head for dinner, or vice versa.

Good to know: The average adult dog eats around 2.5% of their target body weight in raw dog food per day.

This percentage is different for puppies, pregnant, working and athlete dogs and can go up to 4.5%.

Wally eats 2-2.5% of his target body weight on a daily basis (between 12-16 oz).

He eats less (2%) during summertime due to our very hot and humid summers here in central NC, and more (2.5%) during the rest of the year.

How to Get Your Dog to Try a Duck Head If He’s Never Had One Before

Some dogs are thrown off by raw duck heads and aren’t sure what to do with them!

One way to get your dog to try a duck head is to offer it frozen as opposed to thawed.  

Another option is to offer a freeze-dried duck head instead. Vital Essentials carries them, and my girl Missy loved their freeze-dried duck heads as an in-between snack.

You can find them at independently owned pet retail stores as part of the Vital Essentials RAW BAR.

Find the nearest store by checking the store finder on the Vital Essentials website. Almost 5000 stores carry VE, so there’s a good chance you’ll find one nearby.

K9sOverCoffee.com | Missy eating a freeze-dried duck head from Vital Essentials
Missy eating a freeze-dried duck head from Vital Essentials

How to Store Raw Duck Heads For Dogs

Raw duck heads can be refrigerated up to 4 days. After that, they’ll have to go into the freezer.

Over the years, I’ve invested in multiple freezers for raw dog food.

If you’re looking to save some money on raw feeding, consider getting one as well. It allows you to buy in bulk and stock up on cuts of meat that are on sale. 

Where to Buy Raw Duck Heads For Dogs

I buy my raw duck heads from Raw Feeding Miami. They come in 5 lb bags that are $17.50. 

Update 2023: They now come in 2.5lb bags that are $12.75.

Tip: You can save 10% off your Raw Feeding Miami order with my referral discount.

Other online raw dog food retailers who sell raw duck heads are True Carnivores and Raw Dog Food and Company.

Leave your comments or questions in the comment section below this blog post!

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Barbara launched her blog K9sOverCoffee in 2014 and has been feeding her dogs raw dog food since 2015. As a former professional dog walker, she’s passionate about balancing species-appropriate exercise with healthy dog nutrition. Barbara is raw dog food nutrition certified from “Dogs Naturally Magazine” and the author of several e-books about minimally processed, balanced raw dog food.


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