Raw organ meat for dogs recipe

Organ Meat For Dogs Recipe

Today I have a quick organ meat for dogs recipe for you all!

It’s super simple too because it mostly consists of 2 organ meats.

I also added a little leftover veggie smorgasbord I didn’t want to go to waste, but that ingredient is optional.

The main focus definitely lies on the 2 muscular organ meats I combined in this recipe – heart and lung!

Specifically, lamb hearts and goat lung, but you can also go with hearts and lung from other protein sources.

So today, I’ll let you peek into my raw feeding kitchen and explain:

  • How I made this recipe
  • How I use the finished product
  • Why organ meat is good for dogs
  • The difference between muscular vs secreting organ meats
  • Where to buy organ meats for your dog’s raw dog food meal prep

Ready? Let’s go!

2 Ingredient Organ Meat For Dogs Recipe

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2 ingredient organ meats for dogs recipe

How To Prepare Organ Meat For Dogs – A Peek Into My Kitchen

All in all, it took me about 30 minutes to make this organ meat recipe, including prep work, clean up and taking photos.

So if you’re not planning on pulling out your camera to document your recipe, you can probably get it done in 20 minutes.

Tools Used

For this particular organ meat recipe, I used the following tools:

Ingredients I Used

And these are the ingredients I used:

  • 1 lb ground lamb hearts
  • 1 lb ground goat lung
  • 5 oz puréed plant matter smorgasbord

Like I said before, I didn’t want the leftover plant matter to go to waste, so I just added it to the organ meats.

You don’t have to do that, but for transparency reasons, I thought I’d let you know what exactly I added!

The ingredients I used for Wally's organ meat blend
From top to bottom: Goat lung, lamb hearts, veggie purée

Prep Work

I bought the lamb hearts and goat lung ground which means I didn’t have to cut them up.

After they were delivered, they went into my raw dog food freezer until I needed them for meal prep – such as for this recipe.

You can either buy yours ground as well or chop up whole organ meats. I buy both options depending on what I can get a deal on.

Next, I let them thaw in a bowl in the fridge overnight.

Time To Mix Things Up

Once the lamb hearts and goat lung were done thawing, I took them out of their respective wrappers and combined them in the bowl.

Tip: I like to wash out my meat wrappers before tossing them into the trash to keep smells at bay, especially during the warmer months.

Then I topped the heart and lamb mix off with the plant matter and transferred everything into my food processor.

Transferring the raw organ meats into my food processor
Transferring the organ meats into my food processor

Technically speaking, I could have stirred the ingredients in my bowl too, but the food processor does a much better job at equally mixing everything up.

When it’s done, the consistency is similar to that of fluffy pancake batter.

2 lbs of homemade organ meat blend for dogs
My organ meat blend after the food processor mixed it up

Once the food processor turned everything into a homogenous batter-like paste, I filled two silicone molds with it and poured the rest into food storage containers.

Filling silicone baking molds and food storage containers with my homemade organ meat blend
Filling silicone baking molds and food storage containers with my homemade organ meat blend

The silicone molds went into my upstairs freezer for quick access, and the food storage containers went into Wally’s downstairs freezer in the basement.

Tip: I like to label all of my filled food storage containers because there’s no way I’ll remember what’s in each container after a few weeks!

You can either use blank removable freezer labels or make your own with a piece of paper and scotch tape.

Labeled raw dog food storage containers
My labeled raw dog food storage containers

How Do I Use This Organ Meat Recipe For My Dog?

I use this recipe in two ways, and you may already have guessed them:

  1. For raw dog food meal prep. That’s the bulk of the organ meat blend that I’m storing in the food storage containers in Wally’s freezer.
  2. As a refreshing snack after our summer walks. That’s where the frozen paw prints and puzzle pieces come into play. When we get back inside from our walk, I just pop one out and give it to Wally.
Frozen organ meat paw treat for Waly
Frozen organ meat paw treat for Waly

Raw Dog Food Math For Organ Meats

As far as using the organ meat blend for raw meal prep, I use it to cover 20% of Wally’s daily muscle meal allowance, which is 2.2 oz.

At 38 lbs, Wally’s at his target body weight where he neither needs to lose nor gain any weight.

Because of this, I feed him at a maintenance percentage of 2.5%.

As the name suggests, this percentage is used to maintain his current body weight.

When I use it, I divide his body weight by 100, and then I multiply the result with 2.5:

38/100 = 0.38×2.5 = 0.95 lb = 15.2 oz

The 15.2 oz are his daily raw dog food allowance, and 70% of that is muscle meat.

That’s 10.64 oz.

Of those 10.64 oz, 20% is 2.128 oz, so roughly 2.2 oz if I round it up.

Check out the resource below to learn how to do the math for homemade raw dog food:

Why Is Organ Meat Good For Dogs?

Organ meats are Mother Nature's multivitamins for dogs.

They're naturally rich in vitamins and (trace) minerals and essentially help keep our dogs healthy.

However, it's important to understand that there are two different buckets of organ meats with differing nutrient profiles:

  1. Secreting organ meats. They secrete a substance.
    • Liver
    • Kidney
    • Spleen
    • Pancreas
    • Eyes
    • Brains
    • Thymus
    • Reproductive organs (testicles, ovaries)
  2. Muscular organ meats. They don't secrete anything.
    • Heart
    • Gizzards
    • Lung
    • Green tripe
    • Tongue
    • Trachea

Since all of these organs have different levels of nutrients, it's important to rotate them as much as possible in raw feeding.

That way, your pup gets access to a large variety of nutrients and you minimize the risk of nutrient deficiencies in their diet.

What's In Raw Lamb Hearts And Raw Goat Lung: Nutrition Facts

Raw hearts are rich in the following:

  • Zinc
  • Iron
  • Taurine
  • Magnesium
  • Coenzyme Q10
  • B Vitamins

Raw lungs are rich in these nutrients:

  • B Vitamins
  • Vitamin C
  • Iron
  • Phosphorus
  • Potassium
  • Selenium

Understand that the amount of nutrients you'll find in a heart and lung differs between the animals they're from.

That's why you don't just want to alternate the muscular organ meats you feed, but also the animals they're from.

So for example, don't just feed chicken hearts and beef lung, but also feed duck hearts, beef hearts, rabbit hearts, etc.

Likewise, try to also feed pork lung, deer lung, etc.

Where To Buy Raw Organ Meat For Dogs?

You can find some cuts of organ meat at the (asian) grocery store, your local butcher or farmer.

For example:

  • Chicken livers, hearts and gizzards
  • Beef kidneys and beef spleen
  • Beef and calf livers
  • Rabbit livers and hearts
  • Pork livers

For other organ meats that are less commonly used in our human cooking, you'll have to rely on raw dog food retailers like:

2 Ingredient Organ Meat For Dogs Recipe: Bottom Line

Organ meat for dogs is rich in Vitamins and (trace) minerals that help support your dog's health.

Try to feed as large a variety of organ meats as you possibly can, and rotate them in your raw dog food meal prep.

Organ meat recipes like the heart and lung blend I shared today are easy to make and store until you need them for meal prep.

They also make great refreshing, healthy snacks during the warmer summer months.

While they're extra fun to look at when you use paw-, bone-, heart- or puzzle piece shaped silicone molds, you can also make them in regular, old fashioned ice cube trays.

Easy organ meat for dogs recipe

Related Reading:

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Barbara launched her blog K9sOverCoffee in 2014 and has been feeding her dogs raw dog food since 2015. As a former professional dog walker, she’s passionate about balancing species-appropriate exercise with healthy dog nutrition. Barbara is raw dog food nutrition certified from “Dogs Naturally Magazine” and the author of several e-books about minimally processed, balanced raw dog food.


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